scroll

 *scroll.txt* For Vim version 5.4. Last change: 1999 Mar 31 VIM REFERENCE MANUAL by Bram Moolenaar Scrolling *scrolling* These commands move the contents of the window. If the cursor position is
moved off of the window, the cursor is moved onto the window (with
'scrolloff' screen lines around it). A page is the number of lines in the
window minus two. The mnemonics for these commands may be a bit confusing.
Remember that the commands refer to moving the window (the part of the buffer
that you see) upwards or downwards in the buffer. When the window moves
upwards in the buffer, the text in the window moves downwards on your screen. 1. Scrolling downwards |scroll-down|
2. Scrolling upwards |scroll-up|
3. Scrolling relative to cursor |scroll-cursor|
4. Scrolling horizontally       |scroll-horizontal|
5. Scrolling synchronously      |scroll-binding| ============================================================================== 1. Scrolling downwards *scroll-down* The following commands move the edit window (the part of the buffer that you
see) downwards (this means that more lines downwards in the text buffer can be
seen): *CTRL-E*
CTRL-E Scroll window [count] lines downwards in the buffer. Mnemonic: Extra lines. *CTRL-D*
CTRL-D Scroll window Downwards in the buffer. The number of lines comes from the 'scroll' option (default: half a screen). If [count] given, first set 'scroll' option to [count]. The cursor is moved the same number of lines down in the file (if possible; when lines wrap and when hitting the end of the file there may be a difference). When the cursor is on the last line of the buffer nothing happens and a beep is produced. See also 'startofline' option. {difference from vi: Vim scrolls 'scroll' screen lines, instead of file lines; makes a difference when lines wrap}     or ** **     or ** *CTRL-F*
CTRL-F Scroll window [count] pages Forwards (downwards) in the buffer. See also 'startofline' option. ============================================================================== 2. Scrolling upwards *scroll-up* The following commands move the edit window (the part of the buffer that you
see) upwards (this means that more lines upwards in the text buffer can be
seen): *CTRL-Y*
CTRL-Y Scroll window [count] lines upwards in the buffer. *CTRL-U*
CTRL-U Scroll window Upwards in the buffer. The number of lines comes from the 'scroll' option (default: half a screen). If [count] given, first set the 'scroll' option to [count]. The cursor is moved the same number of lines up in the file (if possible; when lines wrap and when hitting the end of the file there may be a difference). When the cursor is on the first line of the buffer nothing happens and a beep is produced. See also 'startofline' option. {difference from vi: Vim scrolls 'scroll' screen lines, instead of file lines; makes a difference when lines wrap}  or ** **   or ** *CTRL-B*
CTRL-B Scroll window [count] pages Backwards (upwards) in the buffer. See also 'startofline' option. ============================================================================== 3. Scrolling relative to cursor *scroll-cursor* The following commands reposition the edit window (the part of the buffer that
you see) while keeping the cursor on the same line: *z* *z*
z Redraw, line [count] at top of window (default cursor line). Put cursor at first non-blank in the line. *zt*
zt Like "z", but leave the cursor in the same column. {not in Vi} *zN*
z{height} Redraw, make window {height} lines tall. This is useful to make the number of lines small when screen updating is very slow. Cannot make the height more than the physical screen height. *z.*
z. Redraw, line [count] at center of window (default cursor line). Put cursor at first non-blank in the line. *zz*
zz Like "z.", but leave the cursor in the same column. Careful: If caps-lock is on, this commands becomes "ZZ": write buffer and exit! {not in Vi} *z-*
z- Redraw, line [count] at bottom of window (default cursor line). Put cursor at first non-blank in the line. *zb*
zb Like "z-", but leave the cursor in the same column. {not in Vi} ============================================================================== 4. Scrolling horizontally *scroll-horizontal* For the following four commands the cursor follows the screen. If the
character that the cursor is on is moved off the screen, the cursor is moved
to the closest character that is on the screen. The value of 'sidescroll' is
not used. z or *zl* *z*
zl Scroll the screen [count] characters to the left. This only works when 'wrap' is off. {not in Vi} z or *zh* *z*
zh Scroll the screen [count] characters to the right. This only works when 'wrap' is off. {not in Vi} *zL*
zL Scroll the screen half a screenwidth to the left. This only works when 'wrap' is off. {not in Vi} *zH*
zH Scroll the screen half a screenwith to the right. This only works when 'wrap' is off. {not in Vi} For the following two commands the cursor is not moved in the text, only the
text scrolls on the screen. *zs*
zs Scroll the screen horizontally to position the cursor at the start (left side) of the screen. This only works when 'wrap' is off. {not in Vi} *ze*
ze Scroll the screen horizontally to position the cursor at the end (right side) of the screen. This only works when 'wrap' is off. {not in Vi} ============================================================================== 5. Scrolling synchronously *scroll-binding* Occasionally, it is desirable to bind two or more windows together such that
when one window is scrolled, the other windows are scrolled also. In Vim,
windows can be given this behavior by setting the (window-specific)
'scrollbind' option. When a window that has 'scrollbind' set is scrolled, all
other 'scrollbind' windows are scrolled the same amount, if possible. The
behavior of 'scrollbind' can be modified by the 'scrollopt' option. *scrollbind-relative*
Each 'scrollbind' window keeps track of its "relative offset," which can be
thought of as the difference between the current window's vertical scroll
position and the other window's vertical scroll position. When one of the
'scrollbind' windows is asked to vertically scroll past the beginning or end
limit of its text, the window no longer scrolls, but remembers how far past
the limit it wishes to be. The window keeps this information so that it can
maintain the same relative offset, regardless of its being asked to scroll
past its buffer's limits. However, if a 'scrollbind' window that has a relative offset that is past its
buffer's limits is given the cursor focus, the other 'scrollbind' windows must
jump to a location where the current window's relative offset is valid. This
behavior can be changed by clearing the 'jump' flag from the 'scrollopt'
option. *syncbind* *:syncbind*
:syncbind Force all 'scrollbind' windows to have the same relative offset. I.e., when any of the 'scrollbind' windows is scrolled to the top of its buffer, all of the 'scrollbind' windows will also be at the top of their buffers. *scrollbind-quickadj*
The 'scrollbind' flag is meaningful when using keyboard commands to vertically
scroll a window, and also meaningful when using the vertical scrollbar of the
window which has the cursor focus. However, when using the vertical scrollbar
of a window which doesn't have the cursor focus, 'scrollbind' is ignored.
This allows quick adjustment of the relative offset of 'scrollbind' windows. top - back to help